Recommended Readings: Zena Werb, Ph.D.

Friday Lecture Series

Detlev Bronk Alumni Lecture

The Cellular Neighborhood: A Master Regulator from Development to Cancer

Zena Werb, Ph.D., professor and vice-chair, department of anatomy, and Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco

March 14, 2014

3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:15 p.m., Abby Lounge)

Caspary Auditorium

Recommended Readings

Chou, J., Lin, J. H., Brenot, A., Kim, J. -., Provot, S., & Werb, Z. (2013). GATA3 suppresses metastasis and modulates the tumour microenvironment by regulating microRNA-29b expression. Nature Cell Biology, 15(2), 201-213

Chou, J., Shahi, P., & Werb, Z. (2013). MicroRNA-mediated regulation of the tumor microenvironment. Cell Cycle, 12(20), 3262-3271

Coussens, L. M., & Werb, Z. (2002). Inflammation and cancer. Nature, 420(6917), 860-867

Egeblad, M., Nakasone, E. S., & Werb, Z. (2010). Tumors as organs: Complex tissues that interface with the entire organism. Developmental Cell, 18(6), 884-901

Engelhardt, J. J., Boldajipour, B., Beemiller, P., Pandurangi, P., Sorensen, C., Werb, Z., . . . Krummel, M. F. (2012). Marginating dendritic cells of the tumor microenvironment cross-present tumor antigens and stably engage tumor-specific T cells. Cancer Cell, 21(3), 402-417

Heissig, B., Lund, L. R., Akiyama, H., Ohki, M., Morita, Y., Rømer, J., . . . Hattori, K. (2007). The plasminogen fibrinolytic pathway is required for hematopoietic regeneration. Cell Stem Cell, 1(6), 658-670

Ohki, M., Ohki, Y., Ishihara, M., Nishida, C., Tashiro, Y., Akiyama, H., . . . Hattori, K. (2010). Tissue type plasminogen activator regulates myeloid-cell dependent neoangiogenesis during tissue regeneration. Blood, 115(21), 4302-4312

 

Imaging Tumor Growth – Potential for Treating Early Stage Cancer

The imaging of tumour growth in zebrafish has revealed for the first time how newly formed cancer cells have the capacity to co-opt the immune system into spreading the disease, leading the way for investigations into potential therapies for eliminating early-stage cancer in humans. Using different coloured fluorescent tags, scientists at the University of Bristol labelled immune cells and tumour-forming cells in the translucent zebrafish in order to track their behaviour and interactions by live cell imaging.  These findings are published in the online in PLoS Biology.