Recommended Readings: Susan Lindquist, Ph.D. October 17

Friday Lecture Series
Friday, October 17, 2014
3:45 p.m., Caspary Auditorium

Susan Lindquist, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology,
Massachussetts Institute of Technology
Member,
Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research
Investigator,
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

From Yeast to Patient Neurons and Back Again: Powerful Discovery Platforms Combatting Neurodegenerative Disease

Recommended Readings

Empirical Articles

Chung, C. Y., Khurana, V., Auluck, P. K., Tardiff, D. F., Mazzulli, J. R., Soldner, F., … Lindquist, S. (2013). Identification and rescue of α-synuclein toxicity in Parkinson patient-derived neurons. Science, 342(6161), 983–987. doi:10.1126/science.1245296

Tardiff, D. F., Jui, N. T., Khurana, V., Tambe, M. A, Thompson, M. L., Chung, C. Y., … Lindquist, S. (2013). Yeast reveal a “druggable” Rsp5/Nedd4 network that ameliorates α-synuclein toxicity in neurons. Science, 342(6161), 979–983. doi:10.1126/science.1245321

Treusch, S., Hamamichi, S., Goodman, J. L., Matlack, K. E. S., Chung, C. Y., Baru, V., … Lindquist, S. (2011). Functional links between Aβ toxicity, endocytic trafficking, and Alzheimer’s disease risk factors in yeast. Science, 334(6060), 1241–1245. doi:10.1126/science.1213210

Review Papers

Khurana, V., & Lindquist, S. (2010). Modelling neurodegeneration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: why cook with baker’s yeast? Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 11(6), 436–449. doi:10.1038/nrn2809

Tardiff, D. F., Khurana, V., Chung, C. Y., & Lindquist, S. (2014). From yeast to patient neurons and back again: A powerful new discovery platform. Movement Disorders, 29(10), 1231–1240. doi:10.1002/mds.25989

Looking into the Future: The Dawn of Regenerative Medicine

George Church is thinking a lot about using regeneration as the key to treatments and keeping people healthy.  Induced pluripotent stem cells “is where I’m putting almost all of my chips these days, because it combines many of my interests — genomics, sequencing, epigenetics, synthetic biology, stem cells,” Church adds. While much of the work so far has been done in rodents, he says that it’ll be years, not decades, until it is tested in people. “The only way people are going to get this is through some brave soul,” Church says. “It will start with a sick person, and they will end up getting well, possibly more well than before they got sick.”   Read more in MIT’S Technology Review‘s Experimental Man.

Recommended Readings; Kevin Eggan, Ph.D., Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Special Seminar Series

“Using Stem Cells and Reprogramming to Understand Neural Degeneration”

Kevin Eggan, Ph.D.,

Assistant professor, Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, and Principal Investigator, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Harvard University; Assistant Investigator, Stowers Medical Institute

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:45 p.m.)

Second Floor, Welch Hall

Recommended Articles:

Di Giorgio, F. P., G. L. Boulting, S. Bobrowicz, and K. C. Eggan. 2008. Human embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons are sensitive to the toxic effect of glial cells carrying an ALS-causing mutation. Cell Stem Cell. 3(6):637-648.

Di Giorgio, F. P., M. A. Carrasco, M. C. Siao, T. Maniatis, and K. Eggan. 2007. Non-cell autonomous effect of glia on motor neurons in an embryonic stem cell-based ALS model. Nature Neuroscience. 10(5):608-614.

Dimos, J. T., K. T. Rodolfa, K. K. Niakan, L. M. Weisenthal, H. Mitsumoto, W. Chung, G. F. Croft, et al. 2008. Induced pluripotent stem cells generated from patients with ALS can be differentiated into motor neurons. Science. 321(5893):1218-1221.

Eggan, K. 2008. Using stem cells and reprogramming to understand disease. Regenerative Medicine. 3(6):799-801.

Egli, D., G. Birkhoff, and K. Eggan. 2008. Mediators of reprogramming: Transcription factors and transitions through mitosis. Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology. 9(7):505-516.

Okarma, T., and K. Eggan. 2008. A seismic shift for stem cell research. Science. 319(5863):560-561+563.