Recommended Readings: Jean-Laurent Casanova, Ph.D. December 1

Monday Lecture Series
Monday, December 1, 2014,
4:00 p.m., Carson Family Auditorium (CRC)

Jean-Laurent Casanova, Ph.D.,
Professor and Head,
St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases,
The Rockefeller University
Investigator,
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Toward a Genetic Theory of Childhood Infectious Diseases

Recommended Readings

Empirical Articles

Puel, A., Cypowyj, S., Bustamante, J., Wright, J. F., Liu, L., Lim, H. K., … Casanova, J.-L. (2011). Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in humans with inborn errors of interleukin-17 immunity. Science, 332(6025), 65–68. doi:10.1126/science.1200439

Sabri, A., Grant, A. V, Cosker, K., El Azbaoui, S., Abid, A., Abderrahmani Rhorfi, I., … El Baghdadi, J. (2014). Association study of genes controlling IL-12-dependent IFN-γ immunity: STAT4 alleles increase risk of pulmonary tuberculosis in Morocco. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 210(4), 611–618. doi:10.1093/infdis/jiu140

Review Papers

Alcaïs, A., Quintana-Murci, L., Thaler, D. S., Schurr, E., Abel, L., & Casanova, J.-L. (2010). Life-threatening infectious diseases of childhood: single-gene inborn errors of immunity? Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1214, 18–33. doi:10.1111/j.1749-6632.2010.05834.x

Casanova, J.-L., & Abel, L. (2005). Inborn errors of immunity to infection: the rule rather than the exception. The Journal of Experimental Medicine, 202(2), 197–201. doi:10.1084/jem.20050854

Recommended Readings: John Mekalanos, Ph.D. October 10

Friday Lecture Series
Friday, October 10, 2014
3:45 p.m., Caspary Auditorium

John Mekalanos, Ph.D.
Adele H. Lehman Professor of Microbiology
Chair, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology,
Harvard Medical School

The Ghost in the Machine: Understanding Bacterial Secretion Systems Through Defining Their Effectors

Recommended Readings

Empirical Articles

Basler, M., Ho, B. T., & Mekalanos, J. J. (2013). Tit-for-tat: type VI secretion system counterattack during bacterial cell-cell interactions. Cell, 152(4), 884–894. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.01.042

Basler, M., Pilhofer, M., Henderson, G. P., Jensen, G. J., & Mekalanos, J. J. (2012). Type VI secretion requires a dynamic contractile phage tail-like structure. Nature, 483(7388), 182–186. doi:10.1038/nature10846

Ma, A. T., McAuley, S., Pukatzki, S., & Mekalanos, J. J. (2009). Translocation of a Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion effector requires bacterial endocytosis by host cells. Cell Host & Microbe, 5(3), 234–243. doi:10.1016/j.chom.2009.02.005

Ma, A. T., & Mekalanos, J. J. (2010). In vivo actin cross-linking induced by Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system is associated with intestinal inflammation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(9), 4365–4370. doi:10.1073/pnas.0915156107

Review Papers

Ho, B. T., Dong, T. G., & Mekalanos, J. J. (2014). A view to a kill: the bacterial type VI secretion system. Cell Host & Microbe, 15(1), 9–21. doi:10.1016/j.chom.2013.11.008

Recommended Readings: Tiffany Reese, Ph.D. October 1

Special Seminar
Wednesday, October 1, 2014
4:00 p.m., Carson Family Auditorium

Tiffany Reese, Ph.D.
Instructor,
Department of Pathology and Immunology,
Washington University School of Medicine

Cytokine Regulation of Gammaherpesvirus Reactivation During Helminth Co-Infection

Recommended Readings

Empirical Articles

Osborne, L. C., Monticelli, L. a., Nice, T. J., Sutherland, T. E., Siracusa, M. C., Hepworth, M. R., … Artis, D. (2014). Virus-helminth coinfection reveals a microbiota-independent mechanism of immunomodulation. Science, 345(6196), 578–582. doi:10.1126/science.1256942

Reese, T. A, Wakeman, B. S., Choi, H. S., Hufford, M. M., Huang, S. C., Zhang, X., … Virgin, H. W. (2014). Helminth infection reactivates latent γ-herpesvirus via cytokine competition at a viral promoter. Science, 345(6196), 573–577. doi:10.1126/science.1254517

Review Papers

Virgin, H. W. (2014). The virome in mammalian physiology and disease. Cell, 157(1), 142–150. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2014.02.032

Recommended Readings: Zhijian ‘James’ Chen, Ph.D. September 26

Friday Lecture Series
Friday, September 26, 2014
3:45 p.m., Caspary Auditorium

Zhijian “James” Chen, Ph.D.
George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Sciences,
Director, Center for Inflammation,
Research Professor, Department of Molecular Biology,

The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Enemy Within – Immune and Autoimmune Responses to cytosolic DNA and RNA

Recommended Readings

Empirical Articles

Gao, D., Wu, J., Wu, Y.-T., Du, F., Aroh, C., Yan, N., … Chen, Z. J. (2013). Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is an innate immune sensor of HIV and other retroviruses. Science, 341(6148), 903–906. doi:10.1126/science.1240933

Li, X.-D., Wu, J., Gao, D., Wang, H., Sun, L., & Chen, Z. J. (2013). Pivotal roles of cGAS-cGAMP signaling in antiviral defense and immune adjuvant effects. Science, 341(6152), 1390–1394. doi:10.1126/science.1244040

Sun, L., Wu, J., Du, F., Chen, X., & Chen, Z. J. (2013). Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the type I interferon pathway. Science, 339(6121), 786–791. doi:10.1126/science.1232458

Zeng, W., Sun, L., Jiang, X., Chen, X., Hou, F., Adhikari, A., … Chen, Z. J. (2010). Reconstitution of the RIG-I pathway reveals a signaling role of unanchored polyubiquitin chains in innate immunity. Cell, 141(2), 315–330. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2010.03.029

Review Papers

Cai, X., Chiu, Y.-H., & Chen, Z. J. (2014). The cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway of cytosolic DNA sensing and signaling. Molecular Cell, 54(2), 289–296. doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2014.03.040

Wu, J., & Chen, Z. J. (2014). Innate immune sensing and signaling of cytosolic nucleic acids. Annual Review of Immunology, 32, 461–88. doi:10.1146/annurev-immunol-032713-120156

Recommended Readings: Michael Strand, Ph.D.

Friday Lecture Series

Polydnaviruses: Viral Mutualists and Nature’s Genetic Engineers

Michael Strand, Ph.D., Regents Professor, department of entomology,

University of Georgia

February 21, 2014

3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:15 p.m., Abby Lounge)

Caspary Auditorium

Recommended Readings

Beck, M. H., & Strand, M. R. (2007). A novel polydnavirus protein inhibits the insect prophenoloxidase activation pathway. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104(49), 19267-19272

Burke, G. R., Thomas, S. A., Eum, J. H., & Strand, M. R. (2013). Mutualistic polydnaviruses share essential replication gene functions with pathogenic ancestors. PLoS Pathogens, 9(5)

Strand, M. R., & Burke, G. R. (2012). Polydnaviruses as symbionts and gene delivery systems. PLoS Pathogens, 8(7), 5

Thoetkiattikul, H., Beck, M. H., & Strand, M. R. (2005). Inhibitor κB-like proteins from a polydnavirus inhibit NF-κB activation and suppress the insect immune response. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(32), 11426-11431

Webb, B. A., Strand, M. R., Dickey, S. E., Beck, M. H., Hilgarth, R. S., Barney, W. E., . . . Witherell, R. A. (2006). Polydnavirus genomes reflect their dual roles as mutualists and pathogens. Virology, 347(1), 160-174

 

Recommended Readings: Yanick Crow, PhD September 17, 2012

Human Type I Interferonopathies

Yanick Crow  PhD

Professor of Genetic Medicine

University of Manchester, UK

Monday, September 17,  2012

4 p.m. , Caspary Auditorium.   Refreshments 3:45 p.m.

Recommended Review:

Banchereau, J; Pascual, V.  2006.  Type I interferon in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases.   IMMUNITY.   25( 3):383-392.      DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2006.08.010

Recommended Readings:

Crow, Y.  2011.  Type I interferonopathies: a novel set of inborn errors of immunity.  Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences   1238: 91-98.     DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2011.06220.x

Briggs, Tracy A.; Rice, Gillian I.; Daly, Sarah; et al.   2011. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase deficiency causes a bone dysplasia with autoimmunity and a type I interferon expression signature. NATURE GENETICS  43(2):127-U71.     DOI: 10.1038/ng.748

 

Alcais, A; Quintana-Murci, L; Thaler, DS.; et al.  2010.  Life-threatening infectious diseases of childhood: single-gene inborn errors of immunity?  Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences    1214:18-33.     DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2010.05834.x

Crow, Yanick J. 2011. Lupus: How much “complexity” is really (just) genetic heterogeneity?  ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM.   63(12): 3661-3664    DOI: 10.1002/art.30603

 

Crow, Y.; Rehwinkel, J.  2009.  Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome and related phenotypes: linking nucleic acid metabolism with autoimmunity.  HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS  18: R130-R136.    DOI: 10.1093/hmg/ddp293

Baechler, EC; Batliwalla, FM; Karypis, G; et al. 2003.  Interferon-inducible gene expression signature in peripheral blood cells of patients with severe lupus.  PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA   100( 5):2610-2615.   DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0337679100

 

 

Recommended Readings: Jason Cyster, Ph.D.

Friday Lecture Series

Sphingolipids and Oxysterols in B Cell Immunity and Cancer

Jason Cyster, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology,

University of California, San Francisco

March 16, 2012

3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:15 p.m., Abby Lounge)

Caspary Auditorium

 

Recommended Readings:

Cinamon, G., M. A. Zachariah, O. M. Lam, F. W. Foss Jr., and J. G. Cyster. 2008. Follicular shuttling of marginal zone B cells facilitates antigen transport. Nature immunology 9, (1): 54-62

Cyster, J. G. 2005. Chemokines, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and cell migration in secondary lymphoid organs. Annual Review of Immunology 23 , pp. 127-159

Okada, T., and J. G. Cyster. 2006. B cell migration and interactions in the early phase of antibody responses. Current opinion in immunology 18, (3): 278-285

Pappu, R., S. R. Schwab, I. Cornelissen, J. P. Pereira, J. B. Regard, Y. Xu, E. Camerer, et al. 2007. Promotion of lymphocyte egress into blood and lymph by distinct sources of sphingosine-1-phosphate. Science 316, (5822): 295-298

Pham, T. H. M., P. Baluk, Y. Xu, I. Grigorova, A. J. Bankovich, R. Pappu, S. R. Coughlin, D. M. McDonald, S. R. Schwab, and J. G. Cyster. 2010. Lymphatic endothelial cell sphingosine kinase activity is required for lymphocyte egress and lymphatic patterning. Journal of Experimental Medicine 207, (1): 17-27

Randall, K. L., T. Lambe, A. Johnson, B. Treanor, E. Kucharska, H. Domaschenz, B. Whittle, et al. 2009. Dock8 mutations cripple B cell immunological synapses, germinal centers and long-lived antibody production. Nature immunology 10, (12): 1283-1291

Recommended Readings: Jeffrey V. Ravetch, Ph. D.

Friday Lecture Series

The Paradox of Immunity

Jeffrey V. Ravetch, M.D., Ph.D., Theresa and Eugene M. Lang Professor and head,

Leonard Wagner Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology,

The Rockefeller University

March 9, 2012

3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:15 p.m., Abby Lounge)

Caspary Auditorium

 

Recommended Readings:

Anthony, R. M., F. Nimmerjahn, D. J. Ashline, V. N. Reinhold, J. C. Paulson, and J. V. Ravetch. 2008. Recapitulation of IVIG anti-inflammatory activity with a recombinant IgG fc. Science 320, (5874): 373-376

Durandy, A., S. V. Kaveri, T. W. Kuijpers, M. Basta, S. Miescher, J. V. Ravetch, and R. Rieben. 2009. Intravenous immunoglobulins-understanding properties and mechanisms. Clinical and experimental immunology 158, (SUPPL. 1): 2-13

Nimmerjahn, F., and J. V. Ravetch. 2010. Antibody-mediated modulation of immune responses. Immunological reviews 236, (1): 265-275

Ravetch, J. 2010. In vivo veritas: The surprising roles of fc receptors in immunity. Nature immunology 11, (3): 183-185

Sazinsky, S. L., R. G. Ott, N. W. Silver, B. Tidor, J. V. Ravetch, and K. D. Wittrup. 2008. Aglycosylated immunoglobulin G1 variants productively engage activating fc receptors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 105, (51): 20167-20172

Immune System Assassin: Perforin in Action

The first observations that the human immune system could punch holes in target cells was made by the Nobel Laureate Jules Bordet over 110 years ago, but we have had to wait for the latest advances in structural molecular biology to find out how exactly this happens.  Scientists from the UK and Australia have seen the human immune system’s assassin — a protein called perforin — in action for the first time.   

Another interesting finding is that the important parts of the perforin molecule are quite similar to those toxins deployed by bacteria such as anthrax, listeria and streptococcus, showing that this method of making holes in cell membranes is quite ancient in evolution.

Perforin is also the culprit when the wrong cells are marked for elimination, either in autoimmune disease conditions, such as early onset diabetes, or in tissue rejection following bone marrow transplantation.

The research was published  October 31 in Nature.