Recommended Readings: Michael Lenardo, M.D., October 23rd

Friday Lecture Series
Friday, October 23, 2015
3:45 p.m., Caspary Auditorium

Michael Lenardo, M.D.
Chief, Molecular Development Section,
Laboratory of Immunology,
Director, NIAID Clinical Genomics Program,
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,
National Institutes of Health

Genomic Approaches to Solving Primary Immune Disorders

Recommended Readings

Empirical Articles

Kuehn, H. S., Ouyang, W., Lo, B., Deenick, E. K., Niemela, J. E., Avery, D. T., … & Uzel, G. (2014). Immune dysregulation in human subjects with heterozygous germline mutations in CTLA4. Science, 345(6204), 1623-1627. doi:10.1126/science.1255904.

Lo, B., Zhang, K., Lu, W., Zheng, L., Zhang, Q., Kanellopoulou, C., … & Jordan, M. B. (2015). Patients with LRBA deficiency show CTLA4 loss and immune dysregulation responsive to abatacept therapy. Science, 349(6246), 436-440. doi:10.1126/science.aaa1663.

Lucas, C. L., Zhang, Y., Venida, A., Wang, Y., Hughes, J., McElwee, J., … & Lenardo, M. J. (2014). Heterozygous splice mutation in PIK3R1 causes human immunodeficiency with lymphoproliferation due to dominant activation of PI3K. The Journal of Experimental Medicine, 211(13), 2537-2547. doi:10.1084/jem.20141759.

Review Papers

Grönholm, J., & Lenardo, M. J. (2015). Novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diabetes- A prime time to treat insulitis as a disease. Clinical Immunology, 156(2), 109-118. doi:10.1016/j.clim.2014.11.007.

Zhang, Y., Su, H. C., & Lenardo, M. J. (2015). Genomics is rapidly advancing precision medicine for immunological disorders. Nature Immunology, 16(10), 1001-1004. doi:10.1038/ni.3275

Cancers Outwit Immune System by Silencing Signaling Mechanism

Scientists at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have shown that muting a key voice in the conversation between human immune cells as they coordinate an effort to fight off infection is an early step in the progression of human cancers.    The study, published May 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that the interferon pathway may harbor a general immune defect in many kinds of cancer. That may help explain the immune dysfunctions seen in numerous cancer patients, and why cancer immunotherapies are often ineffective.