Recommended Readings: James Wells, Ph.D., February 5

Friday Lecture Series
Friday, February 5, 2016
3:45 p.m., Carson Family Caspary Auditorium

James M. Wells, Ph.D.
Professor of Pediatrics,
Perinatal Institute Endowed Professor,
Division of Development Biology,
Director for Basic Research,
Division of Endocrinology,
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

Pluripotent Stem Cell-based Models of Human Gastrointestinal Development and Disease

Recommended Reading

Empirical Articles

McCracken, K. W., Catá, E. M., Crawford, C. M., Sinagoga, K. L., Schumacher, M., Rockich, B. E., … & Wells, J. M. (2014). Modelling human development and disease in pluripotent stem-cell-derived gastric organoids. Nature. 516(7531):400-404. doi: 10.1038/nature13863.

Spence, J. R., Mayhew, C. N., Rankin, S. A., Kuhar, M. F., Vallance, J. E., Tolle, K., … & Shroyer, N. F. (2011). Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into intestinal tissue in vitro. Nature, 470(7332), 105-109. doi: 10.1038/nature09691

Watson, C. L., Mahe, M. M., Múnera, J., Howell, J. C., Sundaram, N., Poling, H. M., … & Grabowski, G. (2014). An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells. Nature Medicine, 20(11), 1310-1314. doi: 10.1038/nm.3737

Review Papers

Sinagoga, K. L., & Wells, J. M. (2015). Generating human intestinal tissues from pluripotent stem cells to study development and disease. The EMBO Journal, 34(9):1149-63. doi: 10.15252/embj.201490686

Wells, J. M., & Spence, J. R. (2014). How to make an intestine. Development, 141(4), 752-760. doi: 10.1242/dev.097386.

Understanding metastasis: Collective Cell Migration Controlled by Wnt and Fgf Signaling

In the November 11, 2008 issue of Developmental Cell, investigators from the University of Utah School of Medicine report the results of their studies in an article entitled Wnt/B-Catenin and Fgf Signaling Control Collective Cell Migration by Restricting Chemokine Receptor Expression.  These studies demonstrate a link between Wnt and Fgf signaling pathways in zebrafish and their impact on collective cell migration. 

The Wnt pathway regulates cell-to-cell communication in embryogenesis and cancer and Fgf influences embryongenesis, healing, and cell proliferation.  Piotrowski and Aman demonstrate for the first time that the interaction between Wnt and Fgf pathways is critical for collective cell migration.  Each pathway can restrict chemokine receptor expression and thereby elucidate how some types of cancer metastisize. 

Extracted from Developmental Cell and ScienceDaily.