Recommended Readings: Andrew Grimson, Ph.D.

Monday Lecture Series

Animal microRNAs: their ancient origin and contemporary targets

Andrew Grimson, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow

Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Monday, March 2, 2009

4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:45 p.m.)

Second Floor, Welch Hall

Recommended Articles:

Glazov, E. A., S. McWilliam, W. C. Barris, and B. P. Dalrymple. 2008. Origin, evolution, and biological role of miRNA cluster in DLK-DIO3 genomic region in placental mammals. Molecular Biology and Evolution. 25(5):939-948.

Farh, K. K. -H, A. Grimson, C. Jan, B. P. Lewis, W. K. Johnston, L. P. Lim, C. B. Burge, and D. P. Bartel. 2005. Biochemistry: The widespread impact of mammalian microRNAs on mRNA repression and evolution. Science. 310(5755):1817-1821.

Grimson, A., K. K. -H Farh, W. K. Johnston, P. Garrett-Engele, L. P. Lim, and D. P. Bartel. 2007. MicroRNA targeting specificity in mammals: Determinants beyond seed pairing. Molecular Cell. 27(1):91-105.

Grimson, A., M. Srivastava, B. Fahey, B. J. Woodcroft, H. R. Chiang, N. King, B. M. Degnan, D. S. Rokhsar, and D. P. Bartel. 2008. Early origins and evolution of microRNAs and piwi-interacting RNAs in animals. Nature. 455(7217):1193-1197.

Piriyapongsa, J., L. Mariño-Ramírez, and I. K. Jordan. 2007. Origin and evolution of human microRNAs from transposable elements. Genetics. 176(2):1323-1337.

On the Catalytic Proficiency of Enzymes….

 

Richard Wolfenden, Ph.D., Alumni Distinguished Professor Biochemistry and Biophysics and Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with co-author Charles A. Lewis, Ph.D., a postdoctoral scientist in his lab, have recently published new work on the evolutionary process of creating the building blocks of RNA and DNA.  Read the full report in PNAS.

Evolution’s New Wrinkle: Proteins With ‘Cruise Control’ Act Like Adaptive Machines

ScienceDaily (Nov. 12, 2008) — A team of Princeton University scientists has discovered that chains of proteins found in most living organisms act like adaptive machines, possessing the ability to control their own evolution.  The research, which appears to offer evidence of a hidden mechanism guiding the way biological organisms respond to the forces of natural selection, provides a new perspective on evolution.  The research was published in a recent edition of Physical Review Letters.