Recommended Readings: Robert H. Singer, Ph.D.

Friday Lecture Series

Following Single mRNAs from Birth to Death

Robert H. Singer, Ph.D., professor and co-chair,

Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

April 12, 2012

3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:15 p.m., Abby Lounge)

Caspary Auditorium

Recommended Readings

Ben-Ari, Y., Brody, Y., Kinor, N., Mor, A., Tsukamoto, T., Spector, D. L., . . . Shav-Tal, Y. (2010). The life of an mRNA in space and time. Journal of Cell Science, 123(10), 1761-1774

Darzacq, X., Yao, J., Larson, D. R., Causse, S. Z., Bosanac, L., De Turris, V., . . . Singer, R. H. (2009). Imaging transcription in living cells . Annual Review of Biophysics 38 (1) , pp. 173-196

Grünwald, D., & Singer, R. H. (2010). In vivo imaging of labelled endogenous Β-actin mRNA during nucleocytoplasmic transport. Nature, 467(7315), 604-607

Katz, Z. B., Wells, A. L., Park, H. Y., Wu, B., Shenoy, S. M., & Singer, R. H. (2012). β-Actin mRNA compartmentalization enhances focal adhesion stability and directs cell migration. Genes and Development, 26(17), 1885-1890

Lionnet, T., Czaplinski, K., Darzacq, X., Shav-Tal, Y., Wells, A. L., Chao, J. A., . . . Singer, R. H. (2011). A transgenic mouse for in vivo detection of endogenous labeled mRNA. Nature Methods, 8(2), 165-170

Park, H. Y., Buxbaum, A. R., & Singer, R. H. (2010). Single mRNA tracking in live cells. Methods in Enzymology, 472, 387-406

Trcek, T., Larson, D. R., Moldón, A., Query, C. C., & Singer, R. H. (2011). Single-molecule mRNA decay measurements reveal promoter-regulated mRNA stability in yeast. Cell, 147(7), 1484-1497

 

Recommended Readings: Jason Cyster, Ph.D.

Friday Lecture Series

Sphingolipids and Oxysterols in B Cell Immunity and Cancer

Jason Cyster, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology,

University of California, San Francisco

March 16, 2012

3:45 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (Refreshments, 3:15 p.m., Abby Lounge)

Caspary Auditorium

 

Recommended Readings:

Cinamon, G., M. A. Zachariah, O. M. Lam, F. W. Foss Jr., and J. G. Cyster. 2008. Follicular shuttling of marginal zone B cells facilitates antigen transport. Nature immunology 9, (1): 54-62

Cyster, J. G. 2005. Chemokines, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and cell migration in secondary lymphoid organs. Annual Review of Immunology 23 , pp. 127-159

Okada, T., and J. G. Cyster. 2006. B cell migration and interactions in the early phase of antibody responses. Current opinion in immunology 18, (3): 278-285

Pappu, R., S. R. Schwab, I. Cornelissen, J. P. Pereira, J. B. Regard, Y. Xu, E. Camerer, et al. 2007. Promotion of lymphocyte egress into blood and lymph by distinct sources of sphingosine-1-phosphate. Science 316, (5822): 295-298

Pham, T. H. M., P. Baluk, Y. Xu, I. Grigorova, A. J. Bankovich, R. Pappu, S. R. Coughlin, D. M. McDonald, S. R. Schwab, and J. G. Cyster. 2010. Lymphatic endothelial cell sphingosine kinase activity is required for lymphocyte egress and lymphatic patterning. Journal of Experimental Medicine 207, (1): 17-27

Randall, K. L., T. Lambe, A. Johnson, B. Treanor, E. Kucharska, H. Domaschenz, B. Whittle, et al. 2009. Dock8 mutations cripple B cell immunological synapses, germinal centers and long-lived antibody production. Nature immunology 10, (12): 1283-1291

Research Advances Understanding of Wound Healing, Cancer Metastasis, and Embryonic Development

By studying cellular movements at the level of both the individual cell and the collective group, applied physicists have discovered that migrating tissues flow very much like colloidal glass.  

Cells often move from one part of the body to another. In a developing embryo, for example, cells in the three germ layers have to arrange themselves spatially so that the cells that will become skin are all on the outside. Similarly, as a cancerous tumor expands, the cells proliferate and push others aside. In wound healing, too, new cells have to move in to replace damaged tissue.   Read more about the research revealing how cells move – and why they stop moving – in PNAS.