Predator Phages Competing In The Gut

A team led by Lora V. Hooper, an associate professor of immunology and microbiology at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and including UT Arlington assistant professor of biology Jorge Rodrigues examined the bacteriophages, or phages, produced by genetic information harbored in the chromosome of the mammalian gut bacterium Enterococcus faecalis. They found that a phage unique to Enterococcus faecalis strain V583 in mice acts as a predator, infecting and harming other similar, competing bacterial strains. They believe these lab results suggest what goes on in the human intestine.

“This organism is using phage as a way to compete in your gut. If the phage is released and gets rid of all the other microbes, then strain V583 will have more nutrients available,” Rodrigues said. “It opens up new questions about the role of phages in the gut system. Ultimately, you could use this as a technique to control bacteria in a natural way.”

The findings were presented in October in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in a paper called, “A composite bacteriophage alters colonization by an intestinal commensal bacterium.” Other co-authors were members of Hooper’s lab: Breck A. Duerkop, Charmaine V. Clements and Darcy Rollins.