Cancer Drug Candidate Leads to Proteomics Method

Scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical have devised an affinity capture-based proteomics technique that could be used to identify and map dysregulated protein pathways in a number of different cancers.

The technique, which was detailed in a paper published Nature Chemical Biology, relies on the inhibitor PU-H71 – a small molecule that selectively binds tumor-enriched Hsp90 proteins, enabling pulldown of Hsp90-bound oncogenic client proteins. According to MSK researcher Gabriela Chiosis ― one of the developers of the method ― measurement of these captured proteins combined with bioinformatic analysis could provide a better understanding of tumor biology.

Sox17 Gene Key to Pathway to Myelination

Through the identification of a gene’s impact on a signaling pathway, scientists at Children’s National Medical Center continue to make progress in understanding the mechanics of a key brain developmental process: growth and repair of white matter, known as myelination. The study, published online in the September 2011online edition of The Journal of Neuroscience, identified Sox17 as the gene that helps regulate the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway during the transition of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, or immature brain cells, to a more mature, differentiated state where they generate myelin.