Library Newsletter

The February 2015 edition of the library’s newsletter is now available!

Please follow this link to download our inaugural issue featuring:

  1. A tutorial on renewing library material online
  2. A list of new books in our scientific and recreational reading collections.
  3. Book recommendations from the library’s science informationist, John Borghi
  4. A description of select services offered by the library: Including Browzine, Mango Languages, and PubSubmit.
  5. A description of AHRQ’s new public access policy
  6. Answers to frequently asked questions: Including how to access library resources while off campus and accessing library materials available through the libraries at Weill Cornell and Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Thanks for reading!

NIH: without budget cuts, we’d have Ebola vaccine

By Fiona Barry, 22-Oct-2014

The head of the US National Institutes of Health has said the organisation would have developed a finished Ebola vaccine by now if its funding had not been slashed over the last decade.

NIH Announces Discovery of Promising Drug Target to Prevent S. aureus Infections

ScienceDaily February 10, 2013.   National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have identified a promising lead for developing a new type of drug to treat infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, notable drug-resistant pathogen. They have discovered a transport system for toxins that are thought to contribute to severe staph infections – phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). The transport system, Pmt, is common to all S. aureus PSMs and critical for bacterial proliferation and disease development in a mouse model. Their experiments suggest that a drug interfering with Pmt’s function could not only prevent production of the PSM toxins, but also directly lead to bacterial death. This research is reported in Nature Medicine.

Attend Webinar Report Dec 14: Global Burden of Disease 2010

Global Burden of Disease 2010 – 14th December 2012

On 14th December 2012 The Lancet together with the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) will host an event to present the findings of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. This unprecedented project has been completed in collaboration with more than 400 researchers in over 300 institutions across 50 countries, led by the IHME and a consortium of five other partners: Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Queensland, University of Tokyo and WHO.

The study began in 2007 and is the most comprehensive effort since the GBD 1990 to produce complete and comparable estimates of the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for the years 1990, 2005, and 2010 for 21 regions covering the entire globe. The GBD 2010 Study is significantly broader in scope than previous versions, including:

• 235 causes of death
• 67 risk factors
• Improved methods for the estimation of mortality and disability

Watch the event live via webcast

Taking place at The Royal Society in London, the event is open to everyone and because we realise that on a practical level many interested parties won’t be able to attend in person, it will be broadcast live via webcast for anyone who chooses to tune in at www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd/live.

Research on Use of Snake-Venom Peptide for Heart Attack Treatment

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), a division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded a $2.5 million grant to Mayo Clinic’s Cardiorenal Research Laboratory to conduct a highly innovative research project, “Cardiovascular Peptides and Myocardial Infarction.” The research will seek to further understand the potential of a novel, engineered guanylyl cyclase (GC) activator, cenderitide, to reduce the level of cardiac and renal injury following a myocardial infarction, or heart attack. Researchers will try to determine whether the therapy could help prevent deterioration of cardiac and renal function following a heart attack, and potentially reduce further heart failure in the future in treated patients.

Mayo researchers invented cenderitide to activate two different subtypes of GC receptors, which uniquely differentiates cenderitide from other GC stimulating peptides. Cenderitide, a designer peptide derived from the venom of the green mamba snake, may aid in the preservation of cardiac and renal function following serious cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and acute decompensated heart failure. 

See the announcement at the Mayo Clinic website.

 

Pediatric Clinical Studies: New Report From the NAS

WASHINGTON — Federal laws that motivate or require drug and biologic developers to conduct pediatric studies have yielded beneficial information to guide the use of medications in children, says a new report by the Institute of Medicine.  Still, studies involving children continue to be limited, especially in certain areas such as medications’ use in newborns and long-term safety and effectiveness in children.  The report identifies ways that Congress and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration could further improve the utility of clinical information obtained from pediatric studies, including expanding innovative strategies to research drugs and biologics in children, using FDA’s authority to require long-term pediatric studies of possible safety risks, and giving FDA flexibility to impose sanctions for unreasonably delayed studies.

White House Bioethics Committee Addressing Genomic Data

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues has begun looking into the ethical concerns brought about by whole genome sequencing, and in particular wants to know what policies may best enable researchers to use genomic data while protecting individual privacy.   more…..

Nannoparticle Vaccines Providing Boost To Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses

For subunit vaccines, adjuvants play a key role in shaping immunological memory. Nanoparticle (NP) delivery systems for antigens and/or molecular danger signals are promising adjuvants capable of promoting both cellular and humoral immune responses, but in most cases the mechanisms of action of these materials are poorly understood. However, NP vaccines may be a promising strategy to enhance the durability, breadth, and potency of humoral immunity by enhancing key elements of the B-cell response.

Read details in PNAS:  Enhancing humoral responses to a malaria antigen with nanoparticle vaccines that expand Tfh cells and promote germinal center induction.