New Open Access Stem Cell-Omics Database

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have launched an open-access database for collecting and analyzing quantitative information about pluripotent stem cells, including data on mRNA, protein, and post-translational modifications.

Named the Stem Cell -Omics Repository, the resource was launched this week to coincide with a study published in Nature Methods comparing the proteomes and phosphoproteomes of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

In addition to providing this protein-level comparison, the paper lays out a proteomic workflow using a relatively large number of samples and biological replicates to draw out subtle but potentially important differences between similar cell types, said study leader Joshua Coon, UW-Madison assistant professor

For the stem-cell work the researchers “combined high accuracy mass spectrometry and isobaric tagging on a large scale” in a way that let them compare proteins and phosphorylation sites across four ESC lines and four iPSC lines in biological triplicate. This enabled them to identify differences between the lines that would otherwise have gone undetected.

National Academies Press Makes All PDF Books Free to Download

As of today all PDF versions of books published by the National Academies Press will be downloadable to anyone free of charge. This includes a current catalog of more than 4,000 books plus all future reports printed by NAP. “Our business model has evolved so that is now financially viable to put this content out to the entire world for free,” said NAP executive director Barbara Kline Pope. “This is a wonderful opportunity to make a positive impact by more effectively sharing our knowledge and analysis.”

Elsevier Announces the “Article of the Future”

Elsevier has launched the ‘Article of the Future’ project, an ongoing collaboration with the scientific community to redefine how a scientific article is presented online. The project takes full advantage of online capabilities, allowing readers individualized entry points and routes through content, while exploiting the latest advances in visualization techniques.

The key feature of the prototypes is a hierarchical presentation of text and figures so that readers can elect to drill down through the layers based on their current task in the scientific workflow and their level of expertise and interest. This organizational structure is a significant departure from the linear-based organization of a traditional print-based article in incorporating the core text and supplemental material within a single unified structure.

A second key feature of the prototypes is bulleted article highlights and a graphical abstract. This allows readers to quickly gain an understanding of the paper’s main ‘take home’ message and serves as a navigation mechanism to directly access specific sub-sections of the results and figures. The graphical abstract is intended to encourage browsing, promote interdisciplinary scholarship and help readers identify more quickly which papers are most relevant to their research interests.

Using content from two previously published Cell articles, the prototypes have been developed by the editorial, production and IT teams at Cell Press in collaboration with Elsevier’s User Centered Design group.

Elsevier and Cell Press are inviting feedback from the scientific community on the concepts at: http://beta.cell.com/