Recommended Readings: Mary Jeanne Kreek, M.D., May 2

Monday Lecture Series
Monday, May 2, 2016
4:00 p.m., Carson Family Auditorium (CRC)

Mary Jeanne Kreek, M.D.
Senior Attending Physician,
The Rockefeller University Hospital
Patrick E. and Beatrice M. Haggerty Professor and Head,
Laboratory of the Biology of Addictive Diseases,
The Rockefeller University

50th Anniversary of First Research Paper on Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Update on Molecular, Neurobiological, Behavioral, and Genetic Research

Recommended Readings:

Bond, C., LaForge, K. S., Tian, M., Melia, D., Zhang, S., Borg, L., … & Tischfield, J. A. (1998). Single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human mu opioid receptor gene alters β-endorphin binding and activity: possible implications for opiate addiction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 95(16), 9608-9613.

Butelman, E. R., Yuferov, V., & Kreek, M. J. (2012). κ-opioid receptor/dynorphin system: genetic and pharmacotherapeutic implications for addiction. Trends in Neurosciences, 35(10), 587-596. doi:10.1016/j.tins.2012.05.005.

Dole, V. P., Nyswander, M. E., & Kreek, M. J. (1966). Narcotic blockade. Archives of Internal Medicine, 118(4), 304-309. doi:10.1001/archinte.1966.00290160004002

Kreek, M. J., Nielsen, D. A., Butelman, E. R., & LaForge, K. S. (2005). Genetic influences on impulsivity, risk taking, stress responsivity and vulnerability to drug abuse and addiction. Nature Neuroscience, 8(11), 1450-1457. doi:10.1038/nn1583

Reed, B., Butelman, E. R., Yuferov, V., Randesi, M., & Kreek, M. J. (2014). Genetics of opiate addiction. Current Psychiatry Reports, 16(11), 1-12. doi:10.1007/s11920-014-0504-6.

Nobel Prizes 2014 – Announcement Date Monday Oct 6

The Nobel Prizes: What you should know ahead of time

By: Ben P. Stein, Director, Inside Science

It’s actually quite remarkable how well the Nobel committees keep the prizes and recipients secret until the announcements. (Update: In the earlier version of this blog, I wrote we were unaware of any leaks of prize information prior to the official announcements. But I have now found that Time had reported one for the 2013 Nobel Peace Prize shortly before it was announced. And bookmakers reported an abrupt increase in the odds for poet Tomas Tranströmer to win shortly before he was named the recipient of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Literature, according to Sweden’s The Local newspaper; Swedish authorities investigated the matter and eventually came to no conclusions, according to the Wall Street Journal. Nonetheless, the Nobel committees’ overall track record seems excellent for keeping the prize information under wraps.)

The Nobel committees contact the often bleary-eyed recipients in the very early morning before announcing the prizes. Last year’s physics announcement was delayed because of the committee’s difficulty in reaching recipient Peter Higgs. He was traveling and doesn’t own a cellphone. For the 2012 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, one of the recipients, Ralph Steinman, died the Friday before the prize was announced, unbeknownst to the Nobel committee. Nobel Prizes can only be given to living individuals, based on the conditions set forth by the Nobel Foundation. But in my opinion, the Nobel committee did the right thing in 2011 and kept Steinman as the recipient even though he was deceased.

Read more at the Inside Science blog.

 

 

Recommended Readings: James E. Darnell, Jr., M.D. May 19

Monday Lecture Series
Monday, May 19, 2014
4:00 p.m., Carson Family Auditorium

James E. Darnell, Jr., M.D.
Vincent Astor Professor Emeritus 
Head, Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology
The Rockefeller University

Then and now – making mRNA: an unbiased (?) look at pre-mRNA synthesis and processing

Recommended Readings:

Empirical Papers

Brenner, S., Jacob, F., & Meselson, M. (1961). An unstable intermediate carrying information from genes to ribosomes for protein synthesis. Nature, 180(4776), 576–581.

Gros, F., Hiatt, H., Gilbert, W., & Kurland, C. (1961). Unstable ribonucleic acid revealed by pulse labelling of Escherichia coli. Nature, 190(4776), 581–585.

Jacob, F., & Monod, J. (1961). Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins. Journal of Molecular Biology, 3, 318–356.

Scherrer, K., Latham, H., & Darnell, J. E. (1963). Demonstration of an unstable RNA and of a precursor to ribosomal RNA in HeLa cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 49(2), 240–248.

Review Articles

Darnell, J. E. (1968). Ribonucleic acids from animal cells. Bacteriological Reviews, 32(3), 262–290.

Darnell, J. E. (2013). Reflections on the history of pre-mRNA processing and highlights of current knowledge: a unified picture. RNA, 19(4), 443–60. doi:10.1261/rna.038596.113

Licatalosi, D. D., & Darnell, R. B. (2010). RNA processing and its regulation: global insights into biological networks. Nature Reviews Genetics, 11(1), 75–87. doi:10.1038/nrg2673

Making (and Learning) History!

Those who don’t know history are doomed to reinvent wheels and miss out on great stories! A historian and a young scientist discuss the rewards and importance of learning about the history of science.

Dr. Carol Moberg, historian of science and Senior Research Associate at The Rockefeller University, shares some of the stories behind her book, Entering an Unseen World, about the history and development of modern cell biology. She’s joined by Rockefeller University Graduate Fellow Joseph Luna, who lends his perspective on the value of studying the history of science for students and young scientists.

Science & the City Podcast

Need A Good Read? Opinions On Best Books of 2011

The most interesting people I know, or have known, generally are those who are widely read on many different topics, and who enjoy many genres.  I know this to be true of our own community.   We are readers.  If you are looking for a good read, here is a look at some opinions from those whose business it is to know, judge, and recommend good books.

The New York Times    The year’s 10 “best”  books: 5 fiction and 5 non fiction

100 Notable Books of 2011.  The New York Times.    A little wider variety.

Amazon  100 Best books of 2011 

Chicago Tribune Thoughts on Year’s Best Reads    list by Tribune staff Julia Keller and Elizabeth Taylor

The Librarians’ Picks for 2011 at The Los Angeles Public LIbrary 

The Boston Globe Picks the Year’s Best Science Books     

My own pick for favorite book in 2011:  David McCullough’s The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris.    In the early decades of the American experiment in democracy, the nation had yet to develop its own great institutions for art, education, and science. Americans were drawn to Europe to complete their educations, to experience culture, to expand their minds beyond the parochial limits of a young and poor nation.  Paris was a shining beacon of all the best the world had to offer, and Americans fell in love with Paris.  David McCullouogh’s book explores the experiences of these pilgrims and how they in turn changed America.  In the 1830’s Paris was a world center of medical knowledge and treatment.  I was particularly impressed with the author’s descriptions of this subject.  The early days of medicine were fascinating, exciting, and gruesome, but here are some of the roots of what we do at Rockefeller.    – Carol Feltes

 

 

One Culture: The Royal Society festival of literature and arts

The Royal Society hosted a festival of literature and arts – the One Culture festival – over the first weekend in October.   This was the Society’s very first literature festival and celebrated 350 years of their science book collection, as they brought together some of the best authors, scientists, poets, historians and theatre practitioners to express, explore and enthuse about science and culture in all its forms.  Many of the presentations and panel discussions for the festival – which was  hosted by, and with introductions by, Rockefeller’s president emeritus, Sir Paul Nurse – are available as webcasts.  Explore the diverse topics and ideas at this Royal Society website.  

Tribute to Dr. Bernadine Healy MD 1944-2011

by: Nancy Walsh (of MedPage Today)  |  August 10, 2011
In 1991, not long after she assumed the directorship of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Dr. Bernadine Healy wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine, “Decades of sex-exclusive research have reinforced the myth that coronary artery disease is a uniquely male affliction and have generated data sets in which men are the normative standard.”She cited the Veterans Administration Cooperative Study, the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial, and the U.S. Physicians Study, the last of which demonstrated the benefits of prophylactic aspirin in preventing myocardial infarction and included 22,000 men — but not one woman.”The extrapolation of these male-generated findings to women has led in some cases to biased standards of care and has prevented the full consideration of several important aspects of coronary disease in women,” Healy wrote. She termed this male-only research attitude the “Yentl syndrome,” referring to a 19th century character in a story by Isaac Bashevis Singer who disguised herself as a man in order to go to school for Talmudic study. “Being ‘just like a man’ has historically been a price women have had to pay for equality,” she wrote.Twenty years later, it seems hard to believe that women then were largely excluded from clinical trials. Healy, who died this week from brain cancer at age 67, dedicated a large part of her career to directing the focus of healthcare research away from its male exclusivity. She insisted that any studies funded by the NIH include women if appropriate.

While at the NIH, she spearheaded the Women’s Health Initiative, which was intended to investigate the major health problems of postmenopausal women, particularly heart disease, cancer, and osteoporosis. The program was launched with $625 million in funding and included more than 160,000 women. Among other findings, the initiative showed that hormone therapy actually was harmful, rather than beneficial as had been assumed.
Dr. Healy recalled that a major obstacle in her career was just being admitted to medical school (Harvard), “at a time when women were seen as an exceptional and questionable addition to the profession.” Her crusade to bring women’s health to the attention of the public and the medical establishment was a singular achievement. The women of America owe her a very large debt.

Death of New York Nobel Laureate: Rosalyn Yalow

Rosalyn Yalow, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine, has died, reports The New York Times. She was 89. At a time when women were discouraged from entering the science, Yalow received her doctorate in nuclear physics and then taught at Hunter College in New York City; she could not get a research position, the Times adds. She then moved to the Bronx Veterans Administration Hospital and began working with Solomon Berson. Together, they developed radioimmunoassays, and found that antibodies could recognize molecules as small as insulin, a finding that was regarded with skepticism. For this work developing radioummunassays, Yalow was the second woman to win the Nobel in medicine. “We are witnessing the birth of a new era of endocrinology, one that started with Yalow,” said the Karolinska Institute in Sweden upon awarding her the Nobel.