Recommended Readings: Jesse Ausubel M.A. October 10, 2016

Monday Lecture Series

Monday October 10, 2016   4 p.m.

Carson Family Auditorium

Jesse Ausubel, M.A.

Director and Senior Research Associate

Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University

Nature Rebounds

Recommended Readings:

Donlan, J; Berger, J; Bock, CE; et al.  Re-wilding North America. NATURE   436 (7053):913-914    AUG 18 2005

Ausubel, Jesse H. and Paul E. Waggoner.  Dematerialization: Variety, caution, and persistence.  PNAS.   105(35):12774-12779.   June 2008.

Pearce, F and J. Ausubel.  Be green, think big. NEW SCIENTIST   189( 2536): 44-46 JAN 28 2006

Ausubel, Jesse H. and Paul E. Waggoner.  Assessing environmental changes in grasslandsSCIENCE  299(5614): 1844-1844      MAR 21 2003

Kauppi, Pekka E.; Ausubel, Jesse H.; Fang, Jingyun; et al.  Returning forests analyzed with the forest identity.  PNAS.  103(46): 17574-17579     NOV 14 2006

NIH: without budget cuts, we’d have Ebola vaccine

By Fiona Barry, 22-Oct-2014

The head of the US National Institutes of Health has said the organisation would have developed a finished Ebola vaccine by now if its funding had not been slashed over the last decade.

The Pearl Meister Greengard Prize: Praising Pioneers in Biomedical Research

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Dr. Huda Zoghbi, 2013 PMG Prize Recipient (image courtesy of The Rockefeller University)
There is nothing particularly remarkable about a woman doing science. Any person — man or woman — who shows an intellectual curiosity combined with a strong work ethic, good decision making, and a little bit of luck can be successful in science. What is remarkable, however, is the severe underrepresentation of women in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields. And for the few women who pursue these career endeavors, their achievements, however great, often go unsung.

To help counteract the inequitable distribution of scientific recognition specifically in biomedical research, Dr. Paul Greengard used the entirety of his 2000 Nobel Prize winnings to establish the Pearl Meister Greengard (PMG) Prize, which spotlights the extraordinary achievements of women in science and hopefully inspires future generations of women scientists in their pursuit of scientific careers. Named after his mother, Pearl Meister, who died while giving birth to him, Dr. Greengard also uses this prize for a very personal reason: to help make the idea of his mother seem less abstract.

Now in its 10th iteration, the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize has been awarded to an outstanding array of pioneering scientists, honoring their contributions to the advancement of biomedical research.

Ceremony is this Thursday, Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. (Caspary Auditorium)

 

Attend Webinar Report Dec 14: Global Burden of Disease 2010

Global Burden of Disease 2010 – 14th December 2012

On 14th December 2012 The Lancet together with the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) will host an event to present the findings of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. This unprecedented project has been completed in collaboration with more than 400 researchers in over 300 institutions across 50 countries, led by the IHME and a consortium of five other partners: Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, University of Queensland, University of Tokyo and WHO.

The study began in 2007 and is the most comprehensive effort since the GBD 1990 to produce complete and comparable estimates of the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for the years 1990, 2005, and 2010 for 21 regions covering the entire globe. The GBD 2010 Study is significantly broader in scope than previous versions, including:

• 235 causes of death
• 67 risk factors
• Improved methods for the estimation of mortality and disability

Watch the event live via webcast

Taking place at The Royal Society in London, the event is open to everyone and because we realise that on a practical level many interested parties won’t be able to attend in person, it will be broadcast live via webcast for anyone who chooses to tune in at www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/gbd/live.

Pediatric Clinical Studies: New Report From the NAS

WASHINGTON — Federal laws that motivate or require drug and biologic developers to conduct pediatric studies have yielded beneficial information to guide the use of medications in children, says a new report by the Institute of Medicine.  Still, studies involving children continue to be limited, especially in certain areas such as medications’ use in newborns and long-term safety and effectiveness in children.  The report identifies ways that Congress and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration could further improve the utility of clinical information obtained from pediatric studies, including expanding innovative strategies to research drugs and biologics in children, using FDA’s authority to require long-term pediatric studies of possible safety risks, and giving FDA flexibility to impose sanctions for unreasonably delayed studies.

White House Bioethics Committee Addressing Genomic Data

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues has begun looking into the ethical concerns brought about by whole genome sequencing, and in particular wants to know what policies may best enable researchers to use genomic data while protecting individual privacy.   more…..

National Academies Select New Executive Officer

WASHINGTON– Bruce B. Darling, currently vice president for laboratory management at the University of California, will soon join the National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council as executive officer.  His transition from the university to NAS will occur over the next several months.  He will succeed E. William Colglazier, who now serves as science and technology adviser at the U.S. Department of State.    Read More. 

Need A Good Read? Opinions On Best Books of 2011

The most interesting people I know, or have known, generally are those who are widely read on many different topics, and who enjoy many genres.  I know this to be true of our own community.   We are readers.  If you are looking for a good read, here is a look at some opinions from those whose business it is to know, judge, and recommend good books.

The New York Times    The year’s 10 “best”  books: 5 fiction and 5 non fiction

100 Notable Books of 2011.  The New York Times.    A little wider variety.

Amazon  100 Best books of 2011 

Chicago Tribune Thoughts on Year’s Best Reads    list by Tribune staff Julia Keller and Elizabeth Taylor

The Librarians’ Picks for 2011 at The Los Angeles Public LIbrary 

The Boston Globe Picks the Year’s Best Science Books     

My own pick for favorite book in 2011:  David McCullough’s The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris.    In the early decades of the American experiment in democracy, the nation had yet to develop its own great institutions for art, education, and science. Americans were drawn to Europe to complete their educations, to experience culture, to expand their minds beyond the parochial limits of a young and poor nation.  Paris was a shining beacon of all the best the world had to offer, and Americans fell in love with Paris.  David McCullouogh’s book explores the experiences of these pilgrims and how they in turn changed America.  In the 1830’s Paris was a world center of medical knowledge and treatment.  I was particularly impressed with the author’s descriptions of this subject.  The early days of medicine were fascinating, exciting, and gruesome, but here are some of the roots of what we do at Rockefeller.    – Carol Feltes

 

 

Project To Develop Metagenomics Tool For Rapid Identification of Microbes

 Battelle Memorial Institute (Columbus, Ohio) announced that it has made an investment of an undisclosed amount in CosmosID for the development of a metagenomics software-based solution for microbial identification.

The investment from Battelle is part of $4 million in financing that CosmosID recently received to support its efforts “to deliver pathogen identification in a single, rapid, and accurate service,” Battelle said, adding that it is partnering with the College Park, Md.-based company to develop and market microbial metagenomics toolkits for public safety and medical treatment applications.

CosmosID’s technology called MetaSeq Genomics uses unassembled reads from next-generation sequencing, probabilistic algorithms, and reference databases to identify pathogens, and antibiotic resistance and virulence factors. The software, which is scalable and updated iteratively, is targeted for diagnostic test development in the markets of public safety and security, medical treatment, environmental monitoring, and drug development, Battelle said.

Privately held CosmosID was founded in 2007 by Rita Colwell, former director of the US National Science Foundation and currently distinguished professor at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Maryland.