Library Newsletter

The February 2015 edition of the library’s newsletter is now available!

Please follow this link to download our inaugural issue featuring:

  1. A tutorial on renewing library material online
  2. A list of new books in our scientific and recreational reading collections.
  3. Book recommendations from the library’s science informationist, John Borghi
  4. A description of select services offered by the library: Including Browzine, Mango Languages, and PubSubmit.
  5. A description of AHRQ’s new public access policy
  6. Answers to frequently asked questions: Including how to access library resources while off campus and accessing library materials available through the libraries at Weill Cornell and Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Thanks for reading!

RU Students Pick Their Favorite Books

MiddlesexAsterios PolypWhite TeethEnder's Game (The Ender Quintet, #1)Before Night Falls

We surveyed RU grad students for their favorite books and now offer them for everyone to enjoy. The full list of these 100 Student Picks and their availability can be found in Tri-Cat. Or, friend us on goodreads (username “Markus Library”).

You can browse the collection in our Cafe Lounge or find some of the titles on our library kindles, available for checkout at the service desk. For more information contact us at libirc@rockefeller.edu

Enjoy!

Dandelion WineMrs. DallowayInvisible ManFire to FireThe Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay

Alfred Russel Wallace (8 January 1823 – 7 November 1913)

Alfred Russel Wallace (8 January 1823 – 7 November 1913) was a British naturalist, explorer, geographer, anthropologist, and biologist. He is best known for independently conceiving the theory of evolution through natural selection; his paper on the subject was jointly published with some of Charles Darwin’s writings in 1858. This prompted Darwin to publish his own ideas in On the Origin of Species. Wallace did extensive fieldwork, first in the Amazon River basin and then in the Malay Archipelago, where he identified the Wallace Line that divides the Indonesian archipelago into two distinct parts: a western portion in which the animals are largely of Asian origin, and an eastern portion where the fauna reflect Australasia.

He was considered the 19th century’s leading expert on the geographical distribution of animal species and is sometimes called the “father of biogeography”. Wallace was one of the leading evolutionary thinkers of the 19th century and made many other contributions to the development of evolutionary theory besides being codiscoverer of natural selection. These included the concept of warning coloration in animals, and the Wallace effect, a hypothesis on how natural selection could contribute to speciation by encouraging the development of barriers against hybridization.

Wallace was strongly attracted to unconventional ideas (such as evolution). His advocacy of spiritualism and his belief in a non-material origin for the higher mental faculties of humans strained his relationship with some members of the scientific establishment. In addition to his scientific work, he was a social activist who was critical of what he considered to be an unjust social and economic system in 19th-century Britain. His interest in natural history resulted in his being one of the first prominent scientists to raise concerns over the environmental impact of human activity.

In honor of the centennial of his death, this short film celebrates the extraordinary life and lasting scientific contributions of the other, arguably more colorful discoverer of natural selection.

‘The Animated Life of A.R. Wallace’

Making (and Learning) History!

Those who don’t know history are doomed to reinvent wheels and miss out on great stories! A historian and a young scientist discuss the rewards and importance of learning about the history of science.

Dr. Carol Moberg, historian of science and Senior Research Associate at The Rockefeller University, shares some of the stories behind her book, Entering an Unseen World, about the history and development of modern cell biology. She’s joined by Rockefeller University Graduate Fellow Joseph Luna, who lends his perspective on the value of studying the history of science for students and young scientists.

Science & the City Podcast

Need A Good Read? Opinions On Best Books of 2011

The most interesting people I know, or have known, generally are those who are widely read on many different topics, and who enjoy many genres.  I know this to be true of our own community.   We are readers.  If you are looking for a good read, here is a look at some opinions from those whose business it is to know, judge, and recommend good books.

The New York Times    The year’s 10 “best”  books: 5 fiction and 5 non fiction

100 Notable Books of 2011.  The New York Times.    A little wider variety.

Amazon  100 Best books of 2011 

Chicago Tribune Thoughts on Year’s Best Reads    list by Tribune staff Julia Keller and Elizabeth Taylor

The Librarians’ Picks for 2011 at The Los Angeles Public LIbrary 

The Boston Globe Picks the Year’s Best Science Books     

My own pick for favorite book in 2011:  David McCullough’s The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris.    In the early decades of the American experiment in democracy, the nation had yet to develop its own great institutions for art, education, and science. Americans were drawn to Europe to complete their educations, to experience culture, to expand their minds beyond the parochial limits of a young and poor nation.  Paris was a shining beacon of all the best the world had to offer, and Americans fell in love with Paris.  David McCullouogh’s book explores the experiences of these pilgrims and how they in turn changed America.  In the 1830’s Paris was a world center of medical knowledge and treatment.  I was particularly impressed with the author’s descriptions of this subject.  The early days of medicine were fascinating, exciting, and gruesome, but here are some of the roots of what we do at Rockefeller.    – Carol Feltes

 

 

One Culture: The Royal Society festival of literature and arts

The Royal Society hosted a festival of literature and arts – the One Culture festival – over the first weekend in October.   This was the Society’s very first literature festival and celebrated 350 years of their science book collection, as they brought together some of the best authors, scientists, poets, historians and theatre practitioners to express, explore and enthuse about science and culture in all its forms.  Many of the presentations and panel discussions for the festival – which was  hosted by, and with introductions by, Rockefeller’s president emeritus, Sir Paul Nurse – are available as webcasts.  Explore the diverse topics and ideas at this Royal Society website.  

New Open Access Stem Cell-Omics Database

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have launched an open-access database for collecting and analyzing quantitative information about pluripotent stem cells, including data on mRNA, protein, and post-translational modifications.

Named the Stem Cell -Omics Repository, the resource was launched this week to coincide with a study published in Nature Methods comparing the proteomes and phosphoproteomes of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

In addition to providing this protein-level comparison, the paper lays out a proteomic workflow using a relatively large number of samples and biological replicates to draw out subtle but potentially important differences between similar cell types, said study leader Joshua Coon, UW-Madison assistant professor

For the stem-cell work the researchers “combined high accuracy mass spectrometry and isobaric tagging on a large scale” in a way that let them compare proteins and phosphorylation sites across four ESC lines and four iPSC lines in biological triplicate. This enabled them to identify differences between the lines that would otherwise have gone undetected.